Southwestern routinely collects data and provides reports from surveys to share with the public. Surveys include the Student Satisfaction Survey (SSI), a Ruffalo Noel survey tool, well as internal tools for employer, graduate, and student services surveys.

Fast Facts and additional demographic information is available within the portal webpages: Resource Center Reports & Surveys

 

 

 

Headcount and FTE (State Funded FTE) - A 10 Year View

Headcount and FTE (State Funded FTE) - A 20 Year View

 

Facts and Figures 2017-18 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14
Student Unduplicated Headcount 7,293  7,397 8,306 7,801 8,508
Average Age - Credit Classes 24  24 24 25 26
Average Class Size - Credit Classes 12  12 12 12 13
Degrees & Certificates Awarded 784  830 943 551 496
Female
Male
Undisclosed
55%
42%
3%
54%
42%
4%
53%
43%
4%
53%
42%
5%
51%
42%
7%
In-District
Out-of-District
Undisclosed
 82%
16%
2%
82%
18%
NA
81%
19%
NA
81%
19%
NA
79%
21%
14%
Programs of Study 76  80 78 77 49

 

Student Success Rates 2017-18 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14

*Graduation Rate (Fall cohort 3 yrs prior)
*Retention Rate (Fall - Fall)
*Transfer Rate (Fall cohort 3 yrs prior)
* Rates for Full-Time First Time Students Only

41%
56%
22%
39%
59%
20%
29%
53%
18%
22%
56%
20%
20%
49%
14%

*IPEDS Reporting for Fall of each year beginning in 2008-09; Cohort = Fall 3 Years Prior (EX: 2015-16 data cohort = Fall 2012

Student Right to Know
Rates Reported Spring 1 Year Later
2017-18 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14

3 Year Graduation Rate as 4 Year Average 
3 Year Transfer Rate as 4 Year Average 

33%
22%
28%
18%
23%
16%
23%
15%

21%
18%

 

Campus Figures 2017-18 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14

Employees
*** Full-time
*** Part-time

349
198
151
353
202
151
347
193
154
366
192
174
380
200
180
Acres Owned 174  174 174 174 174
Acres Developed 83  83 83 83 83
Number of Buildings 44  44 44 44 44

***IPEDS Reporting for Fall of each year

 

Student Diversity 2017-18 (Data Available End of November 2018)
All Unduplicated Headcount Percent First Time Full Time Freshman 2017 Percent Pell Grant Recipient 2017 Percent
Female 55%    
Male 42%    
Nondisclosed Gender 3%    
American Indian or Alaska Native 2%    
Asian or other Pacific Islander 1%    
Black or African American 1%    
Hispanic/Latino 7%    
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander 1%    
White 54%    
2 or more races 3%    
Unknown 31%    

Refer to the IPEDS Surveys for breakdown of current year diversity information available 

from the College Navigator website 

 

Student Diversity 2016-17
All Unduplicated Headcount Percent First Time Full Time Freshman 2016 Percent Pell Grant Recipient 2016 Percent
Female 54% 54% 61%
Male 42% 46% 39%
Nondisclosed Gender 4% 0% 0%
American Indian or Alaska Native 2% 3% 3%
Asian or other Pacific Islander 1% 3% 2%
Black or African American < 1% 2% 3%
Hispanic/Latino 6% 13% 13%
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander <1% 1% <1%
White 53% 69% 69%
2 or more races 2% 8% 8%
Unknown 35% <1% 1%

Refer to the IPEDS Surveys for breakdown of current year diversity information available
from the College Navigator website

 

Student Diversity 2015-16
All Unduplicated Headcount Percent First Time Full Time Freshman 2015 Percent Pell Grant Recipient 2015 Percent
Female 53% 52% 60%
Male 43% 48% 40%
Nondisclosed Gender 4% 1% 0%
American Indian or Alaska Native 2% 3% 4%
Asian or other Pacific Islander 1% 2% 1%
Black or African American < 1% 2% 3%
Hispanic/Latino 5% 12% 13%
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander 1% 1% 1%
White 52% 69% 68%
2 or more races 2% 6% 5%
Unknown 36% 5% 5%

Refer to the IPEDS Surveys for breakdown of current year diversity information available
from the College Navigator website

 

Student Diversity 2014-15
All Unduplicated Headcount Percent First Time Full Time Freshman 2014 Percent Pell Grant Recipient 2014 Percent
Female 53% 53% 61%
Male 42% 47% 39%
Nondisclosed Gender 5% 0% 0%
American Indian or Alaska Native 2% 4% 4%
Asian or other Pacific Islander 1% 3%  1%
Black or African American < 1% 2% 2%
Hispanic/Latino 5% 16% 13%
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander < 1% 1% 1%
White 52% 63% 66%
2 or more races 2% 6% 6%
Unknown 36% 5% 7%

Refer to the IPEDS Surveys for breakdown of current year diversity information available
from the College Navigator website

 

Student Diversity 2013-14
All Unduplicated Headcount Percent First Time Full Time Freshman 2013 Percent Pell Grant Recipient 2013 Percent
Female 51% 55% 55%
Male 42% 45% 45%
Nondisclosed Gender 7% 0% 0%
American Indian or Alaska Native 3% < 2% < 2%
Asian or other Pacific Islander < 2% 1% < 1%
Black or African American < 1% 2% < 2%
Hispanic/Latino 4% 7% 7%
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander < 1% < 2%  2%
White 63% 70% 69%
2 or more races 4% 6% 7%
Unknown 23% 10% 11%

Refer to the IPEDS Surveys for breakdown of current year diversity information available
from the College Navigator website

 

Student Diversity 2012-13
All Unduplicated Headcount Percent First Time Full Time Freshman 2013 Percent Pell Grant Recipient 2013 Percent
Female 48% 50% 62%
Male 41% 49% 38%
Nondisclosed Gender 11% 1% 1%
American Indian or Alaska Native 2% 4% 4.6%
Asian or other Pacific Islander 1% 1% 1%
Black or African American 1% 1% 1%
Hispanic/Latino 3.3% 7% 7%
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander 1% 1% 1%
White 44% 55% 61%
2 or more races 1.3% 4% 3.9%
Unknown 47.8% 27% 21%

Refer to the IPEDS Surveys for breakdown of current year diversity information available
from the College Navigator website

Student Diversity 2011-12
All Unduplicated Headcount Percent First Time Full Time Freshman 2011 Percent Pell Grant Recipient Percent
Female 48% 48% 61%
Male 41% 51% 39%
Nondisclosed Gender 11% 1% 0%
American Indian or Alaska Native 2% 3% 3.5%
Asian or other Pacific Islander 1% 2.5% 1%
Black or African American 1% 1% 1.5%
Hispanic/Latino 3.5% 4% 7%
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander 2% 1% 1%
White 45% 51% 60%
2 or more races 1% 1% 2.5%
Unknown 35% 24% 47%

Refer to the IPEDS Surveys for breakdown of current year diversity information available
from the  College Navigator website

The Economic Impact Study by Economic Modeling Specialist Intl. (EMSI) assesses the impact of SWOCC as a whole on the regional economy and the benefits generated by the college for students, taxpayers, and society. EMSI uses labor market data to provide useful information that help SWOCC understand the connection between our economy, people and work. Results from the study indicate

• Every $1 invested by students results in $5.90 higher future earnings - an average annual rate of 18.3%

• The total annual impact on the SWOCC Service Area sum to $78.5 million

• The total impact represents 4% of the total regional economy and supports 1,985 jobs

$215 million benefit from future earnings, tax revenue, private savings

Access the reports from the public portal: Economic Impact Studies

While SWOCC creates an economic impact through its operations, construction, and student spending, the greatest economic impact of SWOCC stems from the added human capital – the knowledge, creativity, imagination, and entrepreneurship – found in its alumni. While attending SWOCC, students receive experience, education, and the knowledge, skills, and abilities that increase their productivity and allow them to command a higher wage once they enter the workforce. But the reward of increased productiv­ity does not stop there. Talented professionals make capital more productive too (e.g., buildings, production facilities, equipment). The employers of SWOCC alumni enjoy the fruits of this increased productivity in the form of additional non-labor income (i.e., higher profits).

Benefits to taxpayers consist of the savings generated by the improved lifestyles of students and the proportionally reduced government expenditures. Education is statistically correlated with a variety of lifestyle changes that generate taxpayer savings across three main categories: 1) health, 2) crime, and 3) unemployment. Improved health habits lower the students’ demand for national health care services. Students are also less likely to commit crimes, so the demand for law enforcement and criminal justice services is reduced (study references are available in the main report). Students are also more employable, so the demand for welfare and unemployment benefits, such as earnings assistance and welfare benefits, is reduced.

In the winter of 2017, SWOCC worked with EMSI to compile this information for the 2015-16 academic year. The reports provide information that Southwestern Oregon Community College plays a significant role in the local economy and is a sound investment from multiple perspectives.

The Student Satisfaction Inventory is a nationally benchmarked student survey offered through Ruffalo Noel Levitz (RNL).  One key to student success is to assess student satisfaction.  According to RNL, "Successful campuses continuously strive to improve the quality of the student experience. In order to do that, you need to know where to focus your efforts.

The Student Satisfaction Inventory gives you a powerful tool to improve the quality of student life and learning. It measures student satisfaction and priorities, showing you how satisfied students are as well as what issues are important to them. Use this data to:

  • Guide strategic action planning
  • Strengthen student retention initiatives
  • Meet accreditation requirements
  • Identify areas of strength for institutional marketing
  • Chart your progress toward campus goals"

Additional information including yearly survey results available on the portal page.

  

Check out the MyLakerLink portal for a list of surveys

A graduate exit survey is administered each year as part of the graduation application process. Information gathered from the survey is analyzed and reported on within the Success Indicator 37 - Graduate Survey that supports the Core Theme Access .

The College routinely surveys students and staff to determine technology needs and gather satisfaction data. Survey results are analyzed and the data used to determine student, faculty and staff needs associated with technology. The data is incorporated into the program review process for the Integrated Technology Services department as well as the Instructional Computing Labs which supports the planning process and integrated into the budget process. Data is also is used to enhance and improve technology-related services including equipment needs of the campus in order to provide a reliable and productive technology infrastructure. Equipment and software maintenance needs are addressed within Success Indicator 19 that supports the Core Theme Sustainability .

 Click on the following link to the Oregon Community College Data

D4A: State of Oregon Reports

 

The Resource Center located in MyLakerLink is a public collection of documents and data information. Additional documents and data tools are available for faculty and staff.

Public Resource Center

 

Faculty and Staff Resource Center

 

Robin Bunnell

Institutional Researcher

ir@socc.edu

(541) 888-7339

Data Request Form (Faculty and Staff form - requires on-campus or VPN login credentials). For public requests, please email the contact listed above.

 

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