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 FIND AN ARTICLE: SEARCH THE LIBRARY’S DATABASES

These databases are either tailored to your subject or they provide coverage over a wide range of interdisciplinary topics. 

Periodical databases: These databases offer access to journal articles, many of which are full-text. Periodicals usually contain original research and are often used to communicate new findings within a field.

  • CINAHL: Full text articles from more than 610 journals to create a definitive research tool for nursing and allied health professions.
  • Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition: This database provides nearly 550 scholarly full text journals focusing on many medical disciplines. Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition also features the Lexi-PAL Drug Guide, which covers 1,300 generic drug patient education sheets with more than 4,700 brand names.
  • Medline: Authoritative information from over 5,400 current biomedical journals using a database created by the National Library of Medicine
  • Health Reference Center Academic:  Provides access to more than 40 nursing and allied health journals, along with consumer health magazines, newsletters and reference books.

 

 FIND A BOOK: ONLINE OR IN THE LIBRARY

 If you can't go the library's stacks, check out our collection of online reference books:

  • Credo Reference Online: Access to more than 600 reference books, including general and specialized encyclopedias and dictionaries for overviews on topics

If you can visit the library, it's easy to browse our collection because we organize books by their subject:

Organizing Books By Subject
SUBJECT CALL NUMBER HEADING
Medicine (general) R
Public aspects of medicine RA
Internal medicine RC
Therapeutics. Pharmacology. RM
Nursing RT

You also might try these reference books:

    Physician’s Desk Reference: Offers information on prescription drugs, including a diagnostic product index, a manufacturer’s  index, and a product identification guide Ref RS 75 .P5 2016
•    Physician’s Desk Reference for Non-Prescription Drugs, Ref RM671.A1.P48 2012
•    Mosby’s Nursing Drug Reference, Ref RM301.12.S55 2015
•    Lange Current Medical Treatment and Diagnosis, Ref RC71.C8 2015
•    Mayo Clinic Family Healthbook: Presents information on health issues, divided by topic, in plain language for medical  practitioners and general readers, Ref RC 81 .M473 2009b
•    Debates on U.S. Healthcare, Ref RA395.A3.D433 2012

 FIND A WEBSITE: USE INTERNET RESOURCES WISELY

  • BioMed Central: Provides access to peer-reviewed articles from open access medical journals, categorized by subject, along with links to information on chemistry, biology, and clinical trials
  • Clinical Trials: Provides governmental information on both federal and private clinical trials and includes information on clinical trial procedures and a glossary
  • Drug Information Portal: The National Library of Medicine provides this searchable database of prescription and non-prescription drugs.
  • The Merck Manual Online Library: Offers overviews of medical disorders, diagnoses, treatments, and symptoms, organized by subject
  • TOXNET: Provides governmental data on toxicology by offering access to a number of databases on environmental health and toxins
  • PubMed Central: Provides citations and free, full-text articles from biomedical journals and digitized versions of back issues, along with a link to PubMed
  • Journal of Community Nursing: Online version of the journal that provides full-text articles of the current issue as well as back issues until 1998
  • Online Medical Dictionary: Provides concise definitions of terms often used in medicine, aimed toward general users.

The following websites are specifically geared toward evidence-based nursing information:

 FIND A PRINT JOURNAL: READ THE LATEST ISSUES

The library subscribes to magazines and journals that are related to your field. Head to Tioga 2 and browse through some of these journals:

  • JAMA
  • American Journal of Nursing
  • Journal of Nursing Education
  • Nursing
  • CMA Today

 CITATION GUIDES: CREATE A BIBLIOGRAPHY

Whether you use websites, electronic journals, reference books, or print resources, you will need a bibliography. Here's some information on how to cite your sources:

  • Avoid inadvertent plagiarism: It's possible to copy from a source and not even know that you've done anything wrong.
  • KnightCite: This great site formats the bibliographic entry for you, and you can select the appropriate style (MLA, APA, Chicago).
  • Guide to the MLA style:  MLA style is generally used for papers written in the humanities.
  • Guide for the APA style:  APA style is generally used for papers written in the social sciences, especially psychology.

FIND MORE HELP: USE COLLEGE RESOURCES

Don't hesitate to talk to a librarian, a tutor, or your instructor when conducting research. Make the most of these resources!

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