Geology Lecture Series at Southwestern

Photo of author Dr. David Montgomery  Image of Book Cover, Growing a Revolution

Coos Bay, OR  –  Southwestern’s geology lecture series is pleased to welcome back geologist and MacArthur Fellow Dr. David R. Montgomery to Southwestern on Saturday, April 14, 2018 at 7:00 pm. Dr. Montgomery will present a lecture based on his book, “Growing A Revolution – Bringing Our Soil Back to Life.” Throughout history, great societies that abused their land withered into poverty or disappeared entirely. Now we risk repeating this ancient story on a global scale due to ongoing soil degradation, a changing climate, and a rising population. Dr. Montgomery introduces us to farmers around the world at the heart of a brewing soil health revolution. He cuts through standard debates about conventional and organic farming to show why regenerative agriculture can benefit farmers and the land. By combining ancient wisdom with modern science, Dave makes the case for an inspiring vision where agriculture becomes the solution to environmental problems by helping feed all of us, cool the planet, and restore life to the land.

Dr. Montgomery received a BS from Stanford and a PhD from UC Berkley. Dave is a professor of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington. His approachable writing has made him a three-time winner of the Washington State Book Award and recipient of the Shea Award presented by the National Association of Geoscience Teachers. Additionally, he has numerous publications in all of the leading peer reviewed scientific journals, including Nature, Science, Geology, GSA Today, and more.

Join us in the lobby before and after Dr. Montgomery’s talk to discuss our south coast links to soil with representatives from the following groups starting at 6:30 pm: Coquille Indian Tribe; OSU Coos County Master Gardener’s Program; South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve and Coos Watershed Association.

Geology Lecture Series talks are free and are held in the Hales Center for the Performing Arts on Southwestern’s Coos Campus, 1988 Newmark Ave., Coos Bay. For those not able to attend in person, all lectures are Livestreamed and archived, with access from the College's website at https://livestream.com/SWOCC/geology2017-18. The final talk in the series this academic year will be by Dr. Josh Roering (University of Oregon) with “Lakes: How geologic accidents help us decipher past earthquakes, climate, and landscapes in Cascadia” on May 19, 2018 at 7:00 pm.  Lecture series sponsors include DB Western, The Mill, the Southwestern Foundation and the College. 

For additional information, please contact Ron Metzger at 541-888-7216.

Anne Nolin with sled on snowy hill

 

Coos Bay, OR – Southwestern Oregon Community College’s popular Geology Lecture Series continues with Dr. Anne Nolin, speaking about “Snow-Forest Interactions in a Changing World” at 7 p.m., Saturday, March 3, 2018 at the Hales Center for Performing Arts.

Dr. Anne Nolin is a Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University where she leads the Mountain Hydroclimatology Research Group. Her research focuses on the interactions of climate with mountain snowpacks and glaciers. Funded by NASA, National Science Foundation, and US Geological Survey she has published on “at risk” snow and melting glaciers from Alaska to the Andes, and helped pioneer new ways of mapping snow and glaciers from space. Dr. Nolin received her Ph.D. degree in Geography from the University of California Santa Barbara. She worked as a Research Scientist at the University of Colorado, spending several field seasons on the Greenland ice sheet prior to joining the faculty at Oregon State University. She is a member of the NASA Science Team for the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument and has won two NASA group achievement awards. She has served as an Expert Reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC AR4), and Associate Editor for Water Resources Research, The Cryosphere, and the Journal of Hydrometeorology.

Join us in the lobby before and after Dr. Nolin’s talk to discuss our south coast links to water, forests and the climate with representatives from the following groups starting at 6:30 pm: the Coquille Tribe; the Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians; South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve and Coos Watershed Association.

Geology Lecture Series talks are free and are held in the Hales Center for the Performing Arts on Southwestern’s Coos Campus, 1988 Newmark Ave., Coos Bay. For those not able to attend in person, all lectures are Livestreamed and archived, with access from the College's web site at https://livestream.com/SWOCC/geology2017-18. Additional talks scheduled this year include: Dr. David Montgomery (University of Washington) presenting “Growing A Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life” on April 14th and concluding this year with Dr. Josh Roering (University of Oregon) with “Lakes: How geologic accidents help us decipher past earthquakes, climate, and landscapes in Cascadia” on May 19th. Lecture series sponsors include DB Western, The Mill, the Southwestern Foundation and the College.

For additional information, please contact Ron Metzger at 541-888-7216.

Coos Bay, OR – Southwestern Oregon Community College’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee is proud to host a FREE three-film series that explores conditions and experiences of incarceration in the United States. The series will run from Feb – April 2018, and will be showing the award-winning documentaries: 13th, Harvest of Empire, and The Least of These. This event, and others, are being organized to foster greater inclusivity, understanding, and support of all our community members.

13th 2

Sat. Feb 10th            13th

 

Harvest of Empire2

Sat. March 10th          Harvest of Empire

 

The Least of These

Sat. April 14th          The Least of These

 

All films will be shown in Eden Hall Room 1 at 6:30 pm, on the Coos Campus of Southwestern, 1988 Newmark Ave., Coos Bay, with a facilitated discussion following each film. This event is for everyone: students and community members. The Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee hopes to promote healthy dialog around issues important to our community and nation as a whole. Southwestern Oregon Community College is committed to maintaining a safe, equitable, and inclusive learning environment for people of diverse backgrounds and experiences.

For any questions please contact Amy Pollicino at education@cooshistory.org.

Film Series Flyer

“Yes, Humans Really Are Causing Earthquakes!”

Graphic of Pump Jack    Map of Injections Wells

 

Coos Bay, OR  –  Southwestern Oregon Community College’s popular Geology Lecture Series continues with Dr. Justin Rubinstein, speaking about “Yes, Humans Really Are Causing Earthquakes!” for the 13th Annual Cascadia Anniversary Lecture at 7 p.m., Friday, January 26, 2018 at the Hales Center for Performing Arts.  The annual Cascadia lecture provides an opportunity to bring leading seismologists to Coos Bay to discuss earthquake and tsunami research around the anniversary of the last great Cascadia event which took place at 9 pm on Jan. 26, 1700.

 

Dr. Rubinstein headshot

Dr. Rubinstein is a seismologist and Deputy Chief of the Induced Seismicity Project at the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Menlo Park, California. His research focuses on the ongoing surge of seismicity in the central United States and its relationship to oil and gas operations. In 2009, the central United States began to experience an unprecedented surge in earthquakes. They soared from an average of 21 per year to over 650 in 2014. Dr. Rubinstein’s work includes developing methods to estimate the likelihood of earthquakes induced by oil and gas operations and field studies of seismicity in the Raton Basin (southern Colorado and northern New Mexico) and the Mississippi Lime Play (southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma). Dr. Rubinstein has worked on many topics related to earthquakes including: earthquake forecasting, controls on earthquake ground shaking, and causes of damage in the 1994 Northridge earthquake near Los Angeles. Rubinstein received his Bachelor’s Degree from University of California, Los Angeles and his Master’s and Doctoral degrees from Stanford University.

Dr. Rubinstein will discuss the many ways in which humans can cause earthquakes, how local geological conditions can influence their impact, and how scientists measure and analyze seismicity. He will also address the actions that states are taking to minimize or stop human-induced earthquakes and how academic scientists, regulators, and the oil and gas industry are collaborating in these efforts.

Geology Lecture Series talks are free and are held in the Hales Center for the Performing Arts on Southwestern’s Coos Campus, 1988 Newmark Ave., Coos Bay.  For those not able to attend in person, all lectures are Livestreamed and archived, with access from the College's web site at https://livestream.com/SWOCC/geology2017-18.  Additional talks scheduled this year include: Dr. Anne Nolin (Oregon State) with "Snow-Forest Interactions in a Changing World" on March 3rd, Dr. David Montgomery (University of Washington) presenting Growing A Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life” on April 14th and concluding this year with Dr. Josh Roering (University of Oregon) with “Lakes: How geologic accidents help us decipher past earthquakes, climate, and landscapes in Cascadia” on May 19th.  Lecture series sponsors include DB Western, the Southwestern Foundation and the College. 

For additional information, please contact Ron Metzger at 541-888-7216.

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